TRU Brain Trust Reviews ‘Wu Massacre’

Written by Andrew. Posted in TRU Brain Trust

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Published on April 16, 2010 with 16 Comments

Do Method Man, Ghostface Killah and Raekwon The Chef have the chops to be able to body a tape together? Do they still have that Wu-Tang Clan sound? Pop the lid and find out.

Black Barbie:

Call me confused when it comes to this C.D. I REALLY started listening to hip-hop in the mid 90’s, around the time that the WuTang Clan came out. Method Man, Raekwon and Ghostface were my favorites out of their 9 man group so I went into listening to this C.D. with (admittedly) high expectations, which to my utter disappointment were not met. I have a few favorites (“It’s That Wu Shit,” “Criminology 2.5,” and “Our Dreams”) but really, they’re just my favorites because they bring me back to the mid-90’s/early 2000 golden era of the group. Really, I could’ve done without this C.D. and just listened to some classic Wu. 2.5/5

Ivan:

I wanted to like this more – I really did. But Def Jam’s lackadaisical attempt at cobbling up some scraps in the guise of a full-fledged collaborative effort from the Brothers from the Grain is as obvious as a chick with butt implants (why am I not surprised that Def Jam prematurely shelled this project out before April 15th?). To be sure, the music itself isn’t awful, but Wu-Massacre’s arrangement – or lack thereof – leaves the listener unsatisfied. It reminds me of Ghost’s “Meh” release, The Big Doe Rehab (I’m guessing that many of Massacre’s tracks might even be reels from that album’s cutting room floor). Sadly, Wu-Massacre’s greatest asset is its sick cover art. As I see it, Meth, Ghost and Rae may be cut from the same cloth but you can’t cut them apart from the Clan. A new Wu-Tang LP oughta be in order to make up for this massacre of an album. 3/5

Rizoh:

This record existing at all is shocking on so many levels. It’s a bold move by a group that’s become synonymous with bold moves. Ghost and Rae bring the usual raw and uncut energy. Meth could’ve easily felt out of place, but he found a way to make himself relevant. While it retains some musical charm (with only one contribution from RZA), the criminology-rap cliches do get in the way. 3.5/5

Andrew:

Meth, Ghost, Rae. Arguably three of the best members of the Wu come together to form what should have been the Captain Planet of mixtapes considering the heavyweight status of the players but the tape came up one Planeteer short – no Ma-Ti. The quality of the beats sat where they should have with the remixed “Smooth Sailing” and “Dangerous” but all three came in under par with either lyrics or flow. 3/5

Nahshon:

This album had the unfortunate distinction of being an instant classic on paper. Wu Massacre takes three of the Clan’s strongest lyricists with the grimiest narratives and puts them against hard-hitting East Coast production. The advantage is that Chef, Meth and Pretty Tony feel right at home spiting those crime stories that we’ve come to know them for. The disadvantage is going to be a too much creative control resting in the hands of guys who are used to having the RZA (who only provided one track) direct their projects. The difference is apparent. I enjoyed the lyrical experimentation in some cases, but would give the production a ‘B-‘.  The album knocks, but don’t be surprised if you reference one of the songs and your boys don’t get it. Highlights: Mef vs. Chef 2/Gunshowers/Pimpin Chipp/Miranda. 3/5

Jaap:

Hot off the release of last year’s OB4CL2, Raekwon announcing a Meth, Rae & Ghost album seemed like great news. The album already laying in stores this quickly is less encouraging though. There’s no cohesiveness between tracks and the album is padded out with two unnecessary skits as well; one already rearing it’s head after the second track. It certainly sounds like Def Jam rushed the project, as Meth recently stated. But with these three guys cooperating, even a swiftly slapped together disc still somehow becomes enjoyable. There are definitely dope moments on here as Meth flows expertly, Ghost tells great stories again and Rae is still relentless on the mic. A new-school classic like OB4CL2 was? No, not by a long shot. An enjoyable B-side to that same album? Yes indeed.3/5

TRU

Andrew

_ _ _ _ _, meet sarcophagus.

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16 Comments

There are currently 16 Comments on TRU Brain Trust Reviews ‘Wu Massacre’. Perhaps you would like to add one of your own?

  1. Haha. The BT gives a collective sigh and kanye-shrug. They can’t all be classics.

  2. Haha. The BT gives a collective sigh and kanye-shrug. They can’t all be classics.

  3. this was upsetting to me.

  4. this was upsetting to me.

  5. I was disappointed as well, with high expectations after OB4CL2. This just seemed slapped together and felt more like a mixtape. But hey, it’s still better than the majority of major releases out there.

  6. I was disappointed as well, with high expectations after OB4CL2. This just seemed slapped together and felt more like a mixtape. But hey, it’s still better than the majority of major releases out there.

  7. Not much of a “debate”… :D

  8. Not much of a “debate”… :D

  9. So the mid 90’s – early 2000 is now the golden age of hip hop? LMAO You’re about ten years off, Cari.

  10. So the mid 90’s – early 2000 is now the golden age of hip hop? LMAO You’re about ten years off, Cari.

  11. Sorry, of the Wu-Tang clan, but still, that time frame was shit for Wu-Tang.

  12. Sorry, of the Wu-Tang clan, but still, that time frame was shit for Wu-Tang.

  13. 3-3.5 seems about right. For what it was, it was quite enjoyable, basically plays through pretty smoothly like an EP with no extreme highs or lows, and at the end of the day, it’s still Rae, Ghost, and Meth rapping, so it’s inherently going to be decent at worst. Obviously, it pales in comparison to what they could achieve if they actually cohesively worked on a legitimate collaboration project, rather than this kind of thrown-together piece.

  14. 3-3.5 seems about right. For what it was, it was quite enjoyable, basically plays through pretty smoothly like an EP with no extreme highs or lows, and at the end of the day, it’s still Rae, Ghost, and Meth rapping, so it’s inherently going to be decent at worst. Obviously, it pales in comparison to what they could achieve if they actually cohesively worked on a legitimate collaboration project, rather than this kind of thrown-together piece.

  15. @IT’S COOL… Where did you see C stating a definition of rap’s golden age? The definition of that term is not only still up for debate, she didn’t even mention it. She was clearly talking about the biggest glory days of the Wu, which range from early/mid 90s to early 00s. From 36 chambers to Supreme Cliente, roughly.

  16. @IT’S COOL… Where did you see C stating a definition of rap’s golden age? The definition of that term is not only still up for debate, she didn’t even mention it. She was clearly talking about the biggest glory days of the Wu, which range from early/mid 90s to early 00s. From 36 chambers to Supreme Cliente, roughly.

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